The International Grains Council (IGC) is reporting that global corn, wheat, and rice production is on pace to set new records this year, destroying an incessant parade of media claims that global warming is devastating crop production.

Here at Climate Realism, we have documented and debunked many of the ridiculous media claims that climate change is decimating crop production (see here, here, here, here, here, here, and here, just in the past month, for example). Global crop production, as well as crop production in most of the world’s nations, sets new records virtually every year as our planet modestly warms. Now, the IGC reports – unsurprisingly – that the same is happening in 2020.

The online agriculture news service, World-Grain.com published a story, “IGC projects record output for corn, wheat and soybeans,” highlighting the findings of the International Grains Council (IGC), that it expects the harvest of key cereal crops, corn, rice, soybeans, and wheat, which are the core staple crops for many peoples around the world, to set records in 2020.

IGC’s August 27 Grain Market Review, projects total global grains production will reach 2.230 billion tons during the 2020-2021 marketing year, representing a 50 million ton increase from its July forecast and a nine percent higher yield than the 2.181 billion tons produced in the previous marketing year.

Climate at a Glance: Crop Yields summarizes U.S. Department of Agriculture and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) data documenting the fact that U.S. crop yields and global crop yields are setting records nearly every year as global climate modestly warms. Thanks in large part to longer growing seasons, fewer frost events, more precipitation, and the fertilization effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide, farmers are producing more food on less land, allowing them to feed a growing global population. Indeed, almost every important U.S. crop has set record yields per acre during the past three years, with most of the top 10 years in yields-per-acre occurring during the past decade.

The FAO’s database shows what’s true of the United States is also true for most countries and most crops around the world, as increasing levels of carbon dioxide help crop production to boom.

When it comes to climate change and crops, the “debate” is between provably false media lies vs. objective data showing times have never been better.

H. Sterling Burnett, Ph.D. is managing editor of Environment & Climate News and a research fellow for environment and energy policy at The Heartland Institute. Burnett worked at the National Center for Policy Analysis for 18 years, most recently as a senior fellow in charge of NCPA’s environmental policy program. He has held various positions in professional and public policy organizations, including serving as a member of the Environment and Natural Resources Task Force in the Texas Comptroller’s e-Texas commission.

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